A building through the ages

Constructed during the late 18th Century, this well known local building in Castle Street Swansea was very much a  landmark until late into the 20th Century. It had functioned at various times as a Civic Office, Labour Exchange and eventually as offices for a local newspaper – the South Wales Evening Post.

Eventually it became vacant and fell into decline and was demolished and the area landscaped as part of the ground of the remaining Castle-keep

Blitz damage

South Prospect

Wartime Swansea and some much needed practice at South Prospect in 1942

Firefighters getting in some practice at South Prospect in 1942

The location of the South Prospect was in the Strand at the bottom of Morris Lane which descends from High Street.

Phillips Parade

Phillips Parade

Phillips Parade bomb damage in Swansea Hospital adjacent

Phillips Parade is a small street immediately adjacent to the then Swansea hospital which itself has now been replaced by a number of flats built in a style sympathetic to the look and feel of the sites former occupant. The photograph above is of some wartime damage that rolled a bombing raid in 1941.

Blitzed

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Dynevor seen here in 1950

Life goes on in Dynevor School in 1950

1950s College street Portland street with Swansea market entrance at the end of the street
High street 1950s, Woolworth on the left

High Street

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High Street was the centre of early town life and the Cameron Hotel was a terminus for local tram routes a very popular and busy street. Sadly today it is a shadow of its former self, very run-down and does not present a good impression to those arriving at the City’s Railway Station.

Thankfully some regeneration work is in progress in a sympathetic less modernist style.

Chemist at 30 High Street in the 1890s

Davies Chemist at 30 High Street in the 1890s

 

1905 Tram Terminus High Street

1905 Tram Terminus High Street outside the Cameron Hotel

High Street Railways Station

Great Western Railway Station upper High Street

Lewis Lewis in High Street Swansea

Lewis Lewis Department store in High Street Swansea

The Grand Hotel

The Grand Hotel

 

 

NEAR the top of Swansea’s High Street stands the lilac-coloured residential block Mackworth Court, owned by the Coastal Housing Group which has been built on the site of The Angel Hotel itself built in 1889 for an entrepreneur R E Jones.  In order to enlarge The Angel, which was conveniently near the Great Western Railway station, Jones purchased for demolition the adjacent Capel Seion, a Welsh congregational chapel, which was then relocated to Henrietta Street.

The Mackworth Hotel High Street demolished in 1971

Swansea’s Mackworth Hotel High Street demolished in 1971

After purchasing the name and licence of the old Mackworth Arms Hotel in Wind Street (demolished in 1898 to make way for the new head Post Office), Jones renamed his hotel “The Angel” to The Mackworth Hotel, and the new venue became Swansea’s foremost hotel for much of the 20th century, popular for wedding receptions and dinner dances (having a resident orchestra). Famous guests were Dame Vera Lynn and the comedy duo Laurel and Hardy, who stayed when appearing at the  Empire Theatre in Oxford Street in September 1952.

The Mackworth was the scene of a murder in 1958, when its proprietor Eric Battye was stabbed to death.   The Hotel closed in 1967 and was demolished in the 1970s.

Read more: http://www.southwales-eveningpost.co.uk/Hotel-popular-place/story-13893758-detail/story.html#ixzz36iFeAMtf

High Street

High Street circa 1909

High Street circa 1909

Long past its best, today High Street is finally undergoing a massive development bringing a very overdue revamp of a long neglected area, long past its best.

High street 1950s, Woolworth on the left

High street 1950s, Woolworth on the left

a clean modern High Street Swansea pictured in 1964

a clean modern High Street Swansea pictured in 1964

woolworth_1941

Leys Fruiters

adjacent to High Street Railway Station

High Street Railways Station

Great Western Railway Station High Street

 

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Gallery

Goat Street

This gallery contains 11 photos.

Connecting Caer Street and Temple Street, and running parallel to Castle Street, this street ceased to exist after the war in the redevelopment of the totally destroyed town centre.  

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Caer Street

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All the buildings on Caer Street were totally destroyed in the Blitz of the town in February 1941, only the original footprint of the road surface remains with all the building replaced with modern shops and a Departmental store later converted to a Pub and an open pedestrian area which itself replaced the 1950s Rest Gardens (later Castle Gardens) on the site of the earlier impressively fronted Ben Evans store.

Caer street with Goat street in foreground, Calvert Street ahead

Caer street with Goat street in foreground, Calvert Street ahead

The remains of Caer Street
The remains of Caer Street
caer street Swansea

caer street Swansea

The building which later houses stores like “Sydney Heath”,  “Treasure” and today serves as Yates, a Public House

Caer Street 1959 showing St Martins bank with St Marys behind

Caer Street 1959 showing St Martins bank with St Marys behind

Caer Street about 1880

Caer Street about 1880